Book Review – How to be ultra spiritual

Book Review – How to be ultra spiritual

I have been laughing at JP’s videos for a while now. His satrical take on the yoga and spiritual community is often hilarious and is a good reminder not to take anything too seriously.

I decided I needed something easy to read during my long haul flights last year and thought this might be the perfect book.

JP leaves nothing out and pokes fun and pretty much everyone. Naturally I loved the chapter on yoga. Sometimes people in the yoga world can take themselves just a little too seriously, so it was quite funny reading through the stereotypes and how your yoga practice could make you ultra spiritual.

It does tend to get a little bit repetitive towards the end and I found myself wishing he wrote a shorter book as it would have kept things fresh. I did have a good few laugh out loud moments and giggles to myself.

If you’re someone who gets easily offended, this is probably not the book for you. JP leaves no religion, practice or wellness belief out which means everyone is getting made fun of, but it’s good humoured and a reminder that sometimes we just need to laugh at ourselves.

If you’re after an easy, fun read, I’d highly recommend it.

Book review – Namaste the Hard Way

I was looking for something easy and interesting to read when I came across this book by Sasha Brown-Worsham. I didn’t know anything about Sasha, but the book sounded interesting.

We follow Sasha on a journey as she reconnects with her mother through her yoga practice years after her mother passes away from cancer. Her mother was an avid yogini, something that rubbed Sasha up the wrong way as a teenager as all she ever wanted was a “normal” mom. She cringes from embarassment when her mom invites one of her friends to do yoga with them, she feels resentment towards her mother’s yoga practice as it takes up her mother’s time, even as she’s getting sick.

It’s a story of loss but also ultimately of understanding and reconnection. I didn’t expect to enjoy the book as much as I did and it even got me thinking about my relationship with my mom when I was younger.

Let me know in the comments below if you’ve read it and what you thought. Also, I’m always keen for book recommendations so please let me know which books you loved and think I might enjoy.

Book Review – A Search in Secret India

I’ll be honest, this was a spur of the moment buy for me. We were renovating our en-suite bathroom camping out in the spare room (usually my yoga room) and I was desperate for something to read to take my mind of the stresses of the building work going on smothering everything in our house in a fine layer of dust.

I downloaded the Kindle version and was hooked from the first page. I didn’t know anything about the author, Paul Brunton, or that the book was first published in 1935. The writing style is definitely of that era, but it reads pretty easily. Paul was born in London and travelled to India and Egypt in search of broadening his knowledge on the sacred and religious practices of these countries. He was convinced that these teachings and practices could be adapted to benefit those living in the West so they too could benefit from them.

The book is written like a travel diary. It starts off with a bit of background information on Paul and how his interest in India, and most importantly, India’s holy men began. He wishes to travel to India, but life happens and it’s not until later he gets the opportunity.

As he travels through India (which couldn’t have been easy back then given how vast the country is), he meets various sages and holy men. Some are merely performers doing magic tricks, while others seem to fit the stories of what he’s heard of the holy men. He documents his experiences and conversations with these holy men. Some he comes across by chance, others suggest the teacher they follow like Ramana Maharshi in Arunachala.

He’s a sceptic when he starts out on his journey and continues to ask the sages he comes across to repeat the seemingly impossible feats they do. Most humour him, but some you get the sense that they feel as a Westener and someone on the outside, i.e. someone who doesn’t follow their teacher or have spent years trying to learn what they’re doing, regardless of how many times they show him he still wouldn’t believe it.

What I like about the book is that you can sense his genuine interest and thirst for knowledge and his quest for turning his focus inwards. I loved reading about his visit in Varanasi as I have travelled there before. I was delighted to read his description of the area around the ghats where I stayed as it matched what I saw exactly. It’s amazing to think that so little in that area has changed architecturally.

I don’t want to give too much away as it’s really well worth reading if you’re interested in yoga and meditation and just interested in India in general.

Book review – Yoga for Life: A Journey to Inner Peace and Freedom

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I recently read Colleen Saidman Yee’s book, Yoga for Life. I didn’t really know what to expect. I’ve known a little bit about her from what I’ve read in articles but this was an opportunity to find out more about her and her love for yoga in her own words.

She has divided the book into different phases of her life. Each chapter is accompanied by a yoga sequence themed around the subject for that chapter. The book read like you were having a casual conversation with her over a cup of tea and I was engaged from the first paragraph.  She opens up about her childhood, her drug addiction and how she overcame it, her modelling career and how she was introduced to yoga. She even talks about how she and Rodney met and the affair that rocked the yoga world at the time.

I think what I liked most about the book was her pure honesty and willingness to put it all out there, knowing that some people might judge her for her past actions. Her message is one of hope and the accompanying yoga sequences are great. She offers plenty of options and even includes a restorative and chair yoga sequence.

It was great learning about her journey, how she found her own voice and became the yoga teacher we all know today.