Book review – Namaste the Hard Way

I was looking for something easy and interesting to read when I came across this book by Sasha Brown-Worsham. I didn’t know anything about Sasha, but the book sounded interesting.

We follow Sasha on a journey as she reconnects with her mother through her yoga practice years after her mother passes away from cancer. Her mother was an avid yogini, something that rubbed Sasha up the wrong way as a teenager as all she ever wanted was a “normal” mom. She cringes from embarassment when her mom invites one of her friends to do yoga with them, she feels resentment towards her mother’s yoga practice as it takes up her mother’s time, even as she’s getting sick.

It’s a story of loss but also ultimately of understanding and reconnection. I didn’t expect to enjoy the book as much as I did and it even got me thinking about my relationship with my mom when I was younger.

Let me know in the comments below if you’ve read it and what you thought. Also, I’m always keen for book recommendations so please let me know which books you loved and think I might enjoy.

How to practice yoga with an injury

How to practice yoga with an injury

There will come a time in most yoga practitioners life when you will find yourself injured. This could be for reasons completely unrelated to yoga, overuse, overstraining, receiving a bad adjustment or just plain old bad luck.

So what’s a yogi or yogini to do?
Sometimes you can still continue to practice asana or the physical part of yoga just by modifying a few poses. Other times complete rest is the best option. As someone who has had a stubborn yoga injury as well as the unrelated bad luck of breaking my foot, I thought I’d share a few tips on what worked for me.

Rest
If the injury is very inflamed and very sore, sometimes it’s good to take a break from your physical practice and rest.

Some people immediately stop practicing. In some cases that’s necessary. Some injuries might be so inflamed that resting it completely is the best thing you can do before you start rehabilitation. Others work through the injury. I opted to work through the injury initially but it soon became apparent that all I was doing was making it more angry.

I went to see a physio therapist and followed his instructions to a T. After several months I still didn’t see any improvements and began to realise that while his treatment might have worked for others, my body wasn’t responding to it. I eventually found an amazing physio who has encouraged me to continue my practice, albeit modified while providing me with some exercises to help build up strength in areas my body is weak in.

Modification
When I broke my foot, the rest of my body was fine I just couldn’t put any weight on my foot for a while. This is where I modified my practice. I adopted a more restorative practice in the beginning, making sure to give my body some rest while it tried to heal.

Once the foot was feeling a little better, I began to modify by popping a block under my leg so I could come into Table Top. I still tried to keep off the foot so my focus was more on seated postures.

Once I could put some weight on it, I incorporated a few standing postures to help with my rehab and to build some strength back into that leg and foot. It was a slow process which changed daily depending on how the foot felt. The important thing is to listen to your body and your health professional.

Focus on the other limbs of yoga
There’s so much more to yoga than just the physical poses. See this as an opportunity to explore and deepen your pranayama (breathing) or meditation practice. When I broke my foot, my meditation practice was pretty sporadic, but it provided the perfect opportunity for me to learn how to sit each morning, even just for 5 to 10 minutes and meditate. Fast forward a couple of months and I now can’t imagine not meditating each day.

So don’t dispair and think you can’t practice when you’re injured. It’s all about listening to your body and adjusting your practice to suit your needs at that time.

5 Tips that helped ease my anxiety

I have always been an anxious person. As a child the feeling of my stomach doing flip flops, nausea and my throat closing up was all too familiar. Unfortunately, it got even worse as I got older. I am incredibly risk averse because I always fear the worst will happen. There are even days where I dread leaving the house, not because I don’t want to go out, but because I’m too anxious and worry something might happen to my fur-kids while I’m away.

I thought I was alone feeling like this, but it turns out anxiety is pretty common, especially in our fast paced world. So I thought I would share how I manage my anxiety and maybe you can find something that will also work for you.

Have a regular yoga asana practice
I have always heard people tell me that yoga worked wonders for their stress levels, better sleep and their anxiety, but to be honest I didn’t really buy into the whole hype. That’s to say, until I finally started practicing regularly. It’s didn’t make my anxiety disappear, but I began to notice the symptoms in my own body much sooner, which meant I could take action to make sure it didn’t get bad. I also found the movement quite calming which meant my anxiety was much less severe.

Meditate
Another one I used to roll my eyes at, but it seriously works for me. Finding that stillness, even just for 5 minutes each morning means I start my day calmer and much more relaxed. If I know I have a busy time coming up, or will need to do something out of my comfort zone I make sure to increase my meditation to sitting for longer, or practicing twice a day.

Pranayama
More specifically, Nadi Shodhana or alternate nostril breathing. During this breathing practice, you sit in a comfortable position and then breathe in through one nostril, close it off, open the other nostril with a finger and breathe out. You then breathe in through that nostril, close it off with your finger, open the other nostril and breathe out. Repeat until you’re done. I know it sounds a little strange but counting and focusing on the breath really helps to calm my body and allow me to focus on one thing, instead of all the worst case scenarios playing out in my head.

If you’re unsure how to practice Nadi Shodhana, I made a little instructional video a while back which you can watch here.

Get out in nature
There is just something calming about standing bare feet on the grass, or sitting underneath a beautiful tree or listening to the sound of the waves crashing on the sand. Heading outside, even just for 5 minutes immediately makes me feel more relaxed.

Asking for help
I think so many of us feel ashamed asking for help, but reaching out when you need a hand is important. Speak to your GP, your partner or a trusted friend. There is also no shame in taking medication or seeing a professional to help you get hold of your anxiety. Have an honest conversation with your GP. Sometimes all you need is something mild to help you through especially tough days, or they can provide you with a referral to see someone who you can work with. My partner knows when I have bad days and always makes sure to offer support. I am especially anxious when flying so he makes sure I have the seat I prefer and holds my hand when we take off and land or is ready for hugs when turbulence gets bad and I need a shoulder to cry on. My GP also knows that flying is tough for me, so I make sure I pop by to have a chat and stock up on medication I might need to help me with my anxiety.

Hopefully you’ll find one or a few of these tips useful if you suffer from anxiety. The important thing to remember is that you’re not alone and that it’s more than ok to reach out if you need help.

Book Review – A Search in Secret India

I’ll be honest, this was a spur of the moment buy for me. We were renovating our en-suite bathroom camping out in the spare room (usually my yoga room) and I was desperate for something to read to take my mind of the stresses of the building work going on smothering everything in our house in a fine layer of dust.

I downloaded the Kindle version and was hooked from the first page. I didn’t know anything about the author, Paul Brunton, or that the book was first published in 1935. The writing style is definitely of that era, but it reads pretty easily. Paul was born in London and travelled to India and Egypt in search of broadening his knowledge on the sacred and religious practices of these countries. He was convinced that these teachings and practices could be adapted to benefit those living in the West so they too could benefit from them.

The book is written like a travel diary. It starts off with a bit of background information on Paul and how his interest in India, and most importantly, India’s holy men began. He wishes to travel to India, but life happens and it’s not until later he gets the opportunity.

As he travels through India (which couldn’t have been easy back then given how vast the country is), he meets various sages and holy men. Some are merely performers doing magic tricks, while others seem to fit the stories of what he’s heard of the holy men. He documents his experiences and conversations with these holy men. Some he comes across by chance, others suggest the teacher they follow like Ramana Maharshi in Arunachala.

He’s a sceptic when he starts out on his journey and continues to ask the sages he comes across to repeat the seemingly impossible feats they do. Most humour him, but some you get the sense that they feel as a Westener and someone on the outside, i.e. someone who doesn’t follow their teacher or have spent years trying to learn what they’re doing, regardless of how many times they show him he still wouldn’t believe it.

What I like about the book is that you can sense his genuine interest and thirst for knowledge and his quest for turning his focus inwards. I loved reading about his visit in Varanasi as I have travelled there before. I was delighted to read his description of the area around the ghats where I stayed as it matched what I saw exactly. It’s amazing to think that so little in that area has changed architecturally.

I don’t want to give too much away as it’s really well worth reading if you’re interested in yoga and meditation and just interested in India in general.

Benefits of bringing yoga into the workplace

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We lead busy lives. We sit for long periods of time staring at our computer screens, our work-life can often times be quite stressful and we rarely get an opportunity to hit pause during the day.

Yoga has been scientifically proven to have a range of positive effects on office workers and it’s an easy practice to bring into the corporate environment.

Benefits include:

  • Reduces lower back pain
  • Reduces stress
  • Increases morale
  • Increases energy
  • Improves concentration and focus

It also give co-workers an opportunity to relax and do a non-work related activity together. This can lead to more harmonious workplace relationships, better conflict resolutions and healthier and happier employees.

There really isn’t a good reason not to bring yoga into the office.

You can access some of the scientific articles around the benefits of yoga here.

International Yoga Day & Winter Solstice

Happy International Yoga Day and Winter Solstice (for those of us in the southern hemisphere!) I started my day on the mat (how else) sharing my passion for yoga with some wonderful students before coming home and doing my own practice. I thought this is the perfect opportunity to share a short Winter Solstice inspired sequence with you.

Remember to hit the subscribe button if you want to join me for more yoga practices.

Warming up before practice

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If I head out to practice first thing in the morning, I often need to warm up first. My tendons and muscles tend to be on the stiff side first thing and I find that doing some warm ups, either as part of my home practice, or before I leave for class really helps my body feel more comfortable. I also find that it prepares me mentally for my practice by making me aware of my breath and how my body is feeling and reacting in poses.

Join me in my latest video as I talk you through a quick warm up that you can do ahead of any yoga practice or your exercise of choice. As always when practicing, remember to listen to your body and stop if you experience any pain.

Remember to click the thumbs up on the video if you liked it and click subscribe if you’d like to receive more yoga related videos in your inbox.

Have a wonderful week!
xx

Yoga Fun – Morning Routine

Hello everyone!

Summer is finally on it’s way and I can’t wait for the warm days to arrive. It’s so much easier for me to get up early in the mornings to go to yoga when it’s light and warm. This doesn’t necessarily mean it’s easy at the moment and I still have my mornings where I just want to sleep in.

On such mornings, I always end up doing some yoga in bed. Just a few poses and some breathing to get my day started. You really can do yoga anywhere. Favourite poses include reclined twists (you can use your pillows as bolsters if you need to), legs up the wall, Cat/Cow and Puppy Pose. Below is a little video I did more for fun, but showing some of the poses I do when I just can’t get myself out of bed. It also features one of my yoga kitties.

I hope you enjoy the video and if you do, don’t forget to subscribe to my channel.

Hope to see you on the mat soon!

Yoga for Shoulders

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Hi everyone!

So I’ve been a little bit busy recently with some exciting new projects, one of which is my new YouTube channel. Expect videos of where I live, my travels and of course, yoga! I plan to create a series of short yoga practices (called yoga bites) which most people could squeeze into their day before or after work. I’m really excited to share this with you and learn a whole new set of skills along the way.

So remember to subscribe to my channel to receive all my latest videos.

 

Book review – Yoga for Life: A Journey to Inner Peace and Freedom

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I recently read Colleen Saidman Yee’s book, Yoga for Life. I didn’t really know what to expect. I’ve known a little bit about her from what I’ve read in articles but this was an opportunity to find out more about her and her love for yoga in her own words.

She has divided the book into different phases of her life. Each chapter is accompanied by a yoga sequence themed around the subject for that chapter. The book read like you were having a casual conversation with her over a cup of tea and I was engaged from the first paragraph.  She opens up about her childhood, her drug addiction and how she overcame it, her modelling career and how she was introduced to yoga. She even talks about how she and Rodney met and the affair that rocked the yoga world at the time.

I think what I liked most about the book was her pure honesty and willingness to put it all out there, knowing that some people might judge her for her past actions. Her message is one of hope and the accompanying yoga sequences are great. She offers plenty of options and even includes a restorative and chair yoga sequence.

It was great learning about her journey, how she found her own voice and became the yoga teacher we all know today.